Dimensions

Shade diameter 50 cm
Shade height 40 cm

Materials

Cable colour White
Details material Nickel-plated brass
Shade finish Transparent and opal
Shade material Wood moulded and acid etched glass

Specification

Canopy included Yes
Suitable for outdoor use No
Year of design 1928

Resources

The PH Septima is regarded as one of Poul Henningsen’s most refined pendants.

Editor's Notes

Louis Poulsen celebrates the brand’s most prolific designer Poul Henningsen by relaunching the glamorous PH Septima glass pendant. First shown in 1928 at the Danish Museum of Decorative Art, the Danish designer presented as an evolution of his PH three-metal-shade system, adding 4 more layers and switching the material. Combining clear and frosted elements made from Italian borosilicate glass, the lamp creates a soft glow while adding a poetic touch to every space. 

What the brand says 

Louis Poulsen brings back Poul Henningsen’s sophisticated seven-shade glass crown, based on the PH Septima 5 with optimized suspension and enhanced glass for better endurance and stability. When exhibited for the first time as a prototype at the Danish Museum of Decorative Art (now Designmuseum Danmark) in 1928, the poetic piece was publically applauded.


Poul Henningsen

Poul Henningsen was born in Copenhagen by the famous Danish actress Agnes Henningsen. He never graduated as an architect, but studied at The Technical School at Frederiksberg, Denmark from 1911-14, and then at Technical College in Copenhagen from 1914-17.

He started practicing traditional functionalistic architecture, but over the years his professional interests changed to focus mainly on lighting which is what he is most famous for. He also expanded his field of occupation into areas of writing, becoming a journalist and an author. For a short period at the beginning of WWII, he was the head architect of the Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen. But like many other creative people, he was forced to flee Denmark during the German occupation but soon became a vital part of the Danish colony of artists living in Sweden.

His lifelong collaboration with Louis Poulsen began in 1925 and lasted until his death. To this day, Louis Poulsen still benefits from his genius. Poul Henningsen was also the first editor of the company magazine “NYT”. The CEO of Louis Poulsen at the time, Sophus Kaastrup-Olsen, gave the magazine to PH as a gift because he had been terminated from the Danish newspaper he worked for (his opinions were too radical).

Poul Henningsen's pioneering work concerning the relations between light structures, shadows, glare, and color reproduction—compared to man’s need for light remains the fondation of the lighting theories still practiced by Louis Poulsen.


Louis Poulsen is a Danish lighting manufacturer born out of the Scandinavian design tradition.