Dimensions

Width 80 cm
Depth 84 cm
Height 70 cm
Weight 21 kg
Seat height 41 cm

Materials

Base finish P03 - Black RAL 9005
Base material Steel
Foam material Moulded Foam
Shell material Beech
Upholstery Main Line Flax MLF01 Aldgate

Specification

Year 1960

The Orange Slice armchair by designer Pierre Paulin is one of the most popular design armchairs in the world.

The iconic armchair makes every room more open, spacious and cheerful. The most striking characteristic of the Orange Slice are the two identical shells of the chair that seem to curl. If you look closely, it is as if the chair is laughing at you.

Timeless design armchair

In 1952, designer Pierre Paulin became acquainted with the technique of bending plywood. This technique was the basis of the F437. Soon the armchair got the nickname Orange Slice, because of the resemblance to orange slices. The Orange Slice armchair is an acclaimed Artifort classic that has been released since 1960, and continues to be popular.

Playful armchair

The Orange Slice is available with a huge range of beautiful colors, fabrics and leather. Iconic in every living room or lobby, and even more beautiful in a group of Orange Slices. The chair seems to change shape from every angle. The armchair is available in two heights. And now even scaled to a Orange Slice junior for the real collectors.


Pierre Paulin

Pierre Paulin (1927) made a considerable impression with a contemporary shell fauteuil, at an international furniture show organised by Kho Liang le. Shortly after the show, he became a freelance designer for Artifort. This marked the beginning of a long and fruitful collaboration. What makes his designs so distinctive is their striking sculptural shape, which earned Paulin many prizes worldwide. His work remains timeless and progressive even today. This is not form for form’s sake but applied design. With comfort as the constant starting-point. Artifort still includes many of Paulin’s designs dating from the nineteen-sixties and seventies in its permanent collection. His work can be admired in museums throughout the world. Apart from furniture, he also designed interiors for the French presidents Pompidou and Mitterrand in the Elysée Palace in Paris. Pierre Paulin died on 13 June 2009 in a hospital in Montpellier (France). The French president Sarkozy honoured him as "the man who made design an art". In November 2009, Paulin was posthumously awarded the distinction of "Royal Designer for Industry" (RDI).


Design that endures. Design that is authoritative.