An exponent of a time when Spanish industrial design was just establishing itself as a professional discipline, this lamp was awarded the Gold Delta in 1964, the highest distinction for a product in Spain.

Circular metal canopy finish
Black - Not Dimmable
Colour Rendering Index
90
Colour Temperature
2700k
Electric black cable length
300cm
Lampshade Finish
White matte aluminium
Light bulb type
LED
Light bulbs included
Yes
Luminous Flux
416lm
Max wattage
3.7w
Overall Height
325 - 825cm
Shade Diameter
22cm
Shade height
16cm
Weight
1kg

The jury that year was chaired by leading Swiss designer and artist Max Bill, a champion of the Ulm School, who eloquently promoted it to the ultimate award. As a result, Miguel Milá, the then young designer of the lamp, affectionately called it the MaxBill lamp, though today it is known as the M64.

To celebrate its 50th anniversary, Santa & Cole is now reediting it in an LED version, with minimal changes to the neck to fit the HeadLed capsule, which affords greater light efficiency and quality. ×


Miguel Milá

A member of the generation of industrial design pioneers in Spain who has seen some of his furniture and lamps become real contemporary classics.

Miguel Milá was born in a Catalan aristocratic family with strong links with the artistic world (his ancestors assigned the Milá House, also known as La Pedrera, to Gaudí), and started working as an interior designer in the architecture studio of his brother Alfonso Milá and Federico Correa. It was the end of the 50s, a time of crisis when Spain hardly knew what industrial design was. There was practically no industry, everything was generally handmade. This framework marked the way Miguel Milá understood design, being sensitive to the pleasure of touching and closer to traditional techniques.

Despite the shortage of objects, means and raw materials of the time, Miguel Milá started designing lamps and furniture, that he soon manufactured in his own company, Tramo. Miguel Milá set up this company with two friends, architects F. Ribas Barangé and E. Pérez Ullibari. This is how Miguel Milá got involved with industrial design.

Out of Tramo, apocopation of Trabajos molestos (annoying works, that is, all the things little brothers have to do), many projects came out. For instance, he developed the previous versions of the famous TMC and TMM lamps (1958 and 1961), timeless classic designs that are still selling nowadays. Some time after, he set up his own industrial and interior design studio.

Miguel Milá participated with the designers and architects of that period in the first meetings in Barcelona to discuss on modernity in architecture, out of which came the question of how to promote design and implant its professional practice. These meetings culminated in the foundation of the ADI-FAD, together with Antoni de Moragas, André Ricard, Bohigas, Cirici Pellicer, Manel Cases and Rafael Marquina. From its beginnings, this association sought to foster Spanish design abroad, and to make a connection between young Spanish professionals and international design.

"I am in reality a pre-industrial designer- has Milá stated-. I feel more comfortable with the technical procedures that allow correcting failures, experimenting during the process, and controlling it to the maximum. That is where my preference for noble materials comes from, the preference for materials that know how to age." This is the case, among others, of the wooden Cesta lamps (1964), the reed Manila lamp (1961); the M68 lamp, made out of aluminium (1968); or the lamp series Americana with natural linen shades.

After a period of silence that coincided with the crazy postmodern 80s, during which he focused on designing interior spaces and exhibitions, he took up his industrial designing projects again, with a more modern and rationalist language, and applied it to urban design. The Neoromántico bench (1995) is a clear example of this, being a bench that in a few year has become usual in urban sceneries. To this first bench have followed the Neoromántico pata liviana (2000) and the Neoromántico aluminio pata liviana (2002).

Miguel Milá has come to be a classic figure in design. In fact, he almost represents the history of Catalan modern design. His work has focused on bringing tradition up to date: many of his products have overcome the circumstances under which they were made, and are still selling nowadays, "thanks to having been born at a time when rigor and honesty were high values", states Milá. In 1987, he was awarded with the Premio Nacional de Diseño and in 2008 reward the Compasso d'Oro in recognition of his career history and his contribution to the promotion of Spanish design.


Santa & Cole is an editing company from Barcelona that lives for industrial design.