Banker’s lamps are one of the earliest kinds of electric lamps.

Depth
25.5cm
Dimmable
No
Finish
Brass Body, Green Diffuser
Height
40cm
Light bulb type
LED
Light bulbs included
Yes
Material
Aluminium
Secondary colour
Green
Suitable for outdoor use
No
Total cable length
250cm
Weight
0.91kg
Width
25.5cm

“Banker’s lamps are one of the earliest kinds of electric lamps. They were made as early as the 1800s. Typically produced of a solid brass base and a green glass shade and functioned as accent or task lighting. Originally they were used by bankers, who worked long hours, looking at small numbers. They needed extra light on their desk to make their job a little easier. “Goldman”, named after an investment banking firm, designed as a step in the evolution of this traditional lamp, Injected with high technology and slick lines.” Ron Gilad

As Gilad often does, the design harks back to one of the great icons of design history. To Gilad, memory is a fundamental part of the identity of objects. For two years, he worked on the banker’s lamp, revising proportions and revolutionizing the scale. Although modernized, certain unmistakable and immediately recognizable traditional elements have been maintained.

With subtlety and wit, Gilad travels the line between the abstract and the functional. His design approach is playful and full of feeling; it is conceptual, irreverent and surreal at the same time. His designs subvert iconic languages in order to make them take on newer, more sophisticated semantic values: Goldman is an illustration of discipline and imagination. × > Goldman”, named after an investment banking firm, designed as a step in the evolution of this traditional lamp, Injected with high technology and slick lines.—Ron Gilad


Ron Gilad

Born in 1972 in Tel-Aviv. After several years spent in New York, he has just moved back to his native city.

Ron Gilad’s hybrid objects combine material with aesthetic play. They sit on the fat, delicious line between the abstract and the functional. His works deal with the relationship between the object and its function, questioning our perceptions. Varying from one-off to limited editions and production pieces, the works have no “expiration date” and reside in both public and private collections worldwide.

Gilad asks unceasing questions in 3D form and fabricates answers that create an arena for fertile doubt. Metaphorically, Gilad is a linguist, creating his own language. He learns the origins of “words” and develops “synonyms”.

Ron Gilad has signed for FLOS various successful pieces like Wallpiercing for the Soft-Architecture collection, Miniteca, La Linea family and Lightspring for the decorative catalogue.


Italian lighting manufacturer Flos has been a driving force in innovative techniques and surprising shapes for over fifty years.