Dimensions

Height 50 cm
Weight 4.5 kg
Diameter 23 cm
Total cable length 200 cm

Materials

Finish Mustard
Materials Lacquered steel with 2 meter clear PVC cord.

Specification

Light bulb cap type E27
Light bulbs included no
Max wattage 40 w
Suitable for contract use No
Suitable for outdoor use No
Year of design 1969

Resources

3D model (.zip)
Download

In 1968 the students’ revolts in Paris, Rome and the United States were overthrowing stiff, old values, and initiating the Flower-Power generation of peace, love and harmony. Same year, Stanley Kubrick pictured the future of the year 2001, featuring the Verner Panton Chair, and man was soon to set foot on the moon.

In the world of design, a colourful, playful pendant hung in restaurants and exhibitions, and very soon, in everybody’s homes. The FlowerPot with its two semicircular spheres facing each other has long proved its lasting design quality and is just as much a synonym of our time, too. & In his young days, Panton often set off from Copenhagen in an odd looking converted Volkswagen for a trek across Europe, dropping in on fellow designers to share ideas - and good meals


Verner Panton

After an apprenticeship with architect / designer Arne Jacobsen, Panton pur- sued a path in furniture and interior design, where he became famous for his avant-garde designs. Such as chairs with no legs and a sofa placed vertically against the wall. In the 60’s and 70’s, his passion for designing entire environ- ments led to immersive interiors featuring his hypnotic patterns and futuristic designs for furniture, lighting, wallpapers, posters and rugs.
Panton’s pioneering use of materials, colours and shapes earned him a repu- tation as a visionary. In recognition of his life achievement, he was awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Dannebrog Order in 1998 by the Queen of Denmark.
The Flower Pot Lamp by Verner Panton became emblematic of the Fower Power peace movement during the 60’s. With its range of vivid colours, it is just as synonymous with modernity now as it was when launched in 1968. Panton’s Topan lamp is its little sister, a simple semi-sphere that can also be configured in clusters. “Panton’s provocative use of materials, geometric shapes and psychedelic colours set him apart from his contemporaries,” notes Martin Kornbek Hansen.“Our portfolio of &tradition products wouldn’t be complete without this endearing example from this evangelist of radical design.”


Craft meets art. Function meets form. Material meets potential.