Wegner designed the sophisticated 1788 armchair in 1963. The lightweight wooden design with interchangeable cushions is ideal for both exclusive public spaces and private homes.

Cbm
0.35m3
Depth
70cm
Fabric/Leather Consumption
1.3m
Height
88cm
Options
With Buttons
Seat Height
43.5cm
Structure Finish
Oak soap treated
Structure Material
Wood
Upholstery Finish
Remix 2 113
Weight
10kg
Width
65.5cm

Space Copenhagen originally designed Spine for the interior design for a Michelin starred restaurant in 2011. Since then, the Spine series has proven extremely successful as a symbol of quality and craftmanship in high-end restaurants, bars and luxury retail shops throughout the world.

As seen in several successful Copenhagen restaurants, Spine is anchored in Nordic tradition, but with an unexpected, personal twist. The simple lines are intuitively familiar, while the unorthodox details give the furniture a striking new aesthetic. Despite the contrasting elements, the top and bottom still merge into a balanced entity.

The Spine series has a solid character where the texture of the wood and upholstery are given solid emphasis. The hand-sewn upholstery for the chair is inspired by techniques that were developed at Fredericia’s workshop for Børge Mogensen’s exclusive 1960’s leather series.

Spine is a fusion of the organic, solid, and modern. In designing the series, Space Copenhagen felt their way forward using their intuition, until reaching a balanced design that invites many hours of relaxation.

Fredericia and Space Copenhagen continue to expand on the Spine series, with the backless Spine Stool launched in 2014. Made in Denmark


Hans J. Wegner

World-renowned designer of iconic Danish chairs, Hans J. Wegner (1914-2007) insisted on infusing his functional designs with a poetic and playful edge. Wegner's essential rocking chair, the J16, was designed as part of a program to popularise the idea of simple modernism led by Børge Mogensen during the 1940s in Denmark.
Hans J. Wegner is acclaimed for his chair designs that made mid-century Danish design popular on an international scale. He began his career as a cabinetmaker in 1931, subsequently studying at the Copenhagen School of Arts & Crafts. Throughout a long and productive life, Wegner designed roughly 500 chairs, many of which have become popular classics that are still in production today.
As a boy, Wegner showed a keen interest in woodcarving, and as a child he often visited the local museum to seek inspiration in the statues. Later, he set his wood carving aside, but took his fascination of wood and sculpture with him when he went on to train as a furniture maker and designer.
Wegner’s design reflects his understanding that a chair is a piece of furniture in close contact with the human body, a fact that places high demands on comfort and ergonomics. If anything, his training in furniture making further nurtured his love of wood and he has a special talent for utilising the wood grain to create surprising sculptural lines.
Wegner was the born the same year as his colleague and friend, Børge Mogensen, where they studied together at the Copenhagen School of Arts and Crafts in Copenhagen. During the 1940’s, Wegner created a number of furniture designs for the Danish Coop FDB, where Mogensen was head of design. In this work, Wegner restricted his design to follow the rational ideas of the pioneering furniture programme. The two designers also collaborated on groundbreaking furniture exhibitions where they projected the future for Danish interior design.
Wegner's furniture is exhibited in prestigious design museums around the world, and he has received several honours and awards. The Lunning Prize in 1951 and The 8th International Design Award 1997, as well as he was appointed Honoury Doctor at the Royal College of Art in London, just to name a few.


Since its foundation in 1911, the family-owned company Fredericia has built up a strong tradition of beautiful craftsmanship and innovative design, developed in close collaboration with a carefully chosen circle of internationally recognised designers.