New Stone Age: leaving polished marble surfaces behind

Moving on from an overload of glossy marble and terrazzo, in the New Stone Age furniture designers are turning to more natural textures.

Moving on from an overload of glossy marble and terrazzo, in the New Stone Age designers are turning to more natural textures with raw and tactile qualities. Carved surfaces and deep grooves create brutal effects with an appearance almost like concrete. The impact can be heightened when juxtaposed with precise glass or shiny metal detailing.

Limestones like Travertine or muted marble variations show designers are moving on from shiny stone surfaces

New Stone Age: leaving polished marble surfaces behind

For their rectangular dining table C080, the Lebanese design duo David/Nicolas chose a grey Travertino Bronzo stone and framed it with silvered brass details.

Image: Courtesy Carpenters Workshop Gallery

New Stone Age: leaving polished marble surfaces behind

German designer Konstantin Grcic developed a series of abstract objects – part furniture and part sculptures – made from the grey-blue Bleu de Savoie stone. Named Volumes, the limited edition pieces were first shown at Galerie Kreo in Paris.

Image: Fabrice Gousset – Courtesy Galerie kreo

New Stone Age: leaving polished marble surfaces behind

Deeply engraved lines define the Marea bathtub and sink, both designed by Elena Salmistraro. Italian stone expert Vicentina Marmi carved the pieces from an Orobic Arabesque Marble which is defined by its beautiful red-bronze grain.

Image: Vincentina Marmi

New Stone Age: leaving polished marble surfaces behind

French designer Stéphane Parmentier chose a light Osso travertine for his throne-like Gallipoli chair, which comes with a seat cushion made from shaved lambskin.

Image: Jean-François Jaussaud of Luxproductions.com

New Stone Age: leaving polished marble surfaces behind

The stepped base of the round Staircase table by Georgian design label Rooms is carved out of a French limestone.

Image: Mattia Iotti for Rooms

New Stone Age: leaving polished marble surfaces behind

Designers Valeriana Lazard and Paul Brissonnet collaborated for the Atlas chair as part of a limited edition of furniture pieces made from a French limestone sourced in Burgundy.

Image: Guram Kapanadze

New Stone Age: leaving polished marble surfaces behind

Clément Brazille achieved a slim, delicate silhouette for his Ocean Travertine side tables, which are obviously made from the eponymous material. The pieces with slim cylindrical legs and a round table top are produced by Ateliers Romeo.

Image: Baptiste Coulon Page

New Stone Age: leaving polished marble surfaces behind

Italian label Ilide launched the Roma wall lamp with a shade cut from travertine. The stnoe is illuminated from the back with LED lights.

Image: Ilide

New Stone Age: leaving polished marble surfaces behind

Danish brand fermLiving has been exploring darker stone variations and has launched the Alza bowl, made from black matte Indian Banswara Marble.

Image: fermLiving

New Stone Age: leaving polished marble surfaces behind

Three chunky travertine modules make up the the Planar Side Table by Brooklyn design studio Fort Standard. The round top sits on the two square pieces forming the base, creating a contrast in shapes.

Image: Fort Standard


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